10 Alternatives for “Like”

“Like” is a short and legit word. Nothing wrong with using it in your writing. But you can also choose more fitting expressions according to their specific meaning.

“You always favor your youngest!” He hit the desk with his fist.FavorTo support or prefer something.
“I will always treasure these memories.” He put his hand on his heart.TreasureTo regard or treat as precious.
The press idolized the president.IdolizeTo regard with blind adoration or devotion.
“I appreciate her helpful and kind feedback.”AppreciateTo value or regard, to be grateful or thankful for something.
“I adore her intellect,” he said with a dreamy expression.
“And I adore her long hair,” his little sister added.
AdoreTo regard with the utmost esteem, love, respect, and honor.
To pay divine honor to something or someone.
To like or admire very much.
Sophia enjoyed her icecream on the hot summer day.EnjoyTo find joy or satisfaction.
She fancied a hot cup of coffee in the cold and bleak morning.FancyTo feel a desire or liking for.
I cherish memories of my old home and cousins.CherishTo care for tenderly or nurture.
To cling fondly to something.
He admired his grandfather’s courage during the war.AdmireTo regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval.
“Of course I care for her and call her every evening! She is my ill sister.”Care forTo feel concern or interest.
To attach importance to something.

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The Problems with Publishing

A must-read!

Nicholas C. Rossis

Author Kristine Kathryn Rusch recently shared a must-read post about today’s state of publishing, aptly titled Trainwreck, Fall Edition.

As she explains, she tried in June to order a copy of a book she liked for her sister. However, she wouldn’t get the book until September. Understandably, her reaction was: How odd. The book had released in February, so she should have been able to get her hands on a copy quickly. But she couldn’t.

Then she remembered that the same thing had happened with a couple of other books she had ordered for her sister back in May. They were backlist for an author her sister hadn’t tried and it took six weeks for her to get the books, with the shipment getting delayed more than once.

Putting two and two together, Kristine realized the ugly truth: traditional publishing is headed for a trainwreck.

The trainwreck

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Literary Agents Part 1. How to Choose Them

There are hundreds of literary agencies. And thousands of literary agents. One of them can be the champion of your work. They will secure the best deals for you, guide you through the marketing process, and support you and your work until your book finds a solid place on as many bookshelves as possible. But the majority of the agents are not the right ones for you. Not because you were a bad writer. But the agents specify a lot and the literature world is very rich. You need to send your queries to people who actually work with books similar to yours. Especially if you write in a marginal genre. How do you choose whom to approach in the first place?

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Shortening your Manuscript

No author avoids at least one of these important steps. Just like with a painting, or cake frosting, a manuscript needs final cuts and touches to make it all smooth, vibrant, and lush.

Perhaps you need to shorten your manuscript extensively. Clench your teeth, wipe your tears… And do it. You can start with easy and convenient tips like these.

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Your Success Stories: R. Benjamin Wesley

About:

After a thirty-year career in academic medicine, teaching, research, and private practice, Dr. Wesley retired from cardiology to pursue his lifetime passion of storytelling. He completed the writing and illustrating of his graphic novel, “Portal of the Ancients: Book One of the Ancients Saga,” the first in a planned series of ten books, to bring his true vision to print. To facilitate this project, he formed Hearts Quest Studio with his wife, Margaret, an MBA with decades of marketing, training, administration, and business development experience. His subsequent novels in the Ancients Saga will further develop the characters and themes introduced in his first book.

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Alpha, Beta… Your Test Readers

Are you a writer? And do you let others read your work? The word beta reader has probably touched your ears. In short, it is someone who tells you what they like about your story and what they don’t. But the writing world is, as everything else, evolving and the whole beta reader thing is more complicated now. People are no longer satisfied with the simple beta label and you can find various other expressions in the writing discussions. Each type of reader is expected to do something different and there are separate groups to find them.

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